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Jose Antonio Baldomero Navarro

Navarro was a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence.

Jose Antonio Baldomero Navarro

Jose Navarro was born February 27, 1795. Early in his boyhood, he lost his father and went to work in a mercantile establishment in Louisiana.  He was fond of reading books, and as scarce as they were, he practically educated himself though it was said he was educated in the best college in Spain and received a literary degree.  He was a friend of Stephen F. Austin, and accompanied him to Mexico to obtain his colonization contract. As a member of the Coahuila-Texas State Congress, he fought for Constitutional Government, and was frequently referred to as the Americanized-Texan.

In 1831, he was appointed Commissioner of DeWitt’s colony. In 1833, he was elected supplementary representative to the General Congress of Mexico. From 1834-1835, he was Land Commissioner for the District of Bexar. In 1835, he was elected senator, but this position he declined and resigned, as he had already made up his mind to join the Texas struggle for Independence.  The same year he was elected by Bexar to the Convention at Washington-on-Brazos.   In that body, with Ruiz and DeZavala, the three Spanish-Americans gave it some appearance of being more than a mere assembly of disgruntled Anglo-Americans.

Navarro was a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence.  His modest nature attracted the attention of the delegation, He at first appeared ill at ease, but as he came in contact with the delegates who greeted him cordially, he threw off his reserve and mingled freely with them and impressed them all that he was sincerely devoted to the cause.  When he was appointed on the Committee to draft the Constitution, he seemed greatly pleased.  During the preparation of the Constitution, he made frequent suggestions regarding its phraseology, demonstrating his familiarity with Republican institutions. 

Navarro was appointed one of the Commissioners to accompany the Santa Fe Expedition.  He was captured and imprisoned in the Acordada for the first two years.  Santa Ana condemned him to life imprisonment in the dungeon of the San Juan Ulloa though he offered him liberty and high office if he would turn against Texas. When Herrera succeeded Santa Ana, Navarro secured his release, and immediately left for Texas, landing at Galveston February 15,1845.  He at once proceeded to San Antonio and was elected a delegate to the Convention which framed the State Constitution. He served in the First State Senate.  A close personal friend in speaking of him said: Mr. Navarro was no ordinary man.  He was a  strong supporter of our American institutions, public spirited and progressive in thought.  In 1846, Robertson County was renamed Navarro County in honor of Navarro When Navarro County was organized in 1848, it was named Corsicana in honor of his father’s place of birth, Corsica.

Source: Frederick Chabot. With the Makers of San Antonio.1937. page 203.


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